Volume 1

Covering the first series (1972-1976) and up to 1981…

Swamp Thing first appeared in House Of Secrets #92, and the success of that story led to the creation of a Swamp Thing series which ran for 24 issues from 1972-1976, with creators Len Wein and Bernie Wrightson contributing to the first 13 and 10 issues respectively.  Swampy then guested in several Challengers Of The Unknown issues throughout 1977-1978, and notably teamed up with Superman (in 1979) and Batman (in 1981).

The series and its creators won several Shazam Awards in 1972 and 1973:

  • 1972 Best Individual Story (Dramatic Division) for ‘Dark Genesis’ (Swamp Thing #1)
  • 1972 Best Writer (Dramatic Division) – Len Wein, for Swamp Thing.
  • 1972 & 1973 Best Penciller (Dramatic Division) – Bernie Wrightson, for Swamp Thing.
  • 1973 Best Continuing Feature.

Appearances that I consider to be fairly minor are indented.  The below titles were published by DC Comics unless otherwise noted.


House of Secrets (1956) #92
“Swamp Thing” (pp. 1-8), June/July 1971
Len Wein [w], Bernie Wrightson [p]
Damian Ridge sabotages Alex Olsen’s laboratory out of jealousy, causing a deadly explosion, before burying Alex’s body in a nearby swamp. Damian goes on to marry Alex’s widow Linda before plotting her murder too. He is foiled and killed by Alex, now resurrected as a swamp monster. Linda flees the monster, not recognising him as her ex-husband.
Reprinted in DC Special Blue Ribbon Digest #9 (May 1981), and as part of the ‘Silver Age Classics’ (1992), ‘Silver Edition’ (1993) and ‘Millennium Edition’ (May 2000) series.

Swamp Thing #1
“Dark Genesis!”, October/November 1972
Len Wein [w], Bernie Wrightson [p]
Alec and Linda Holland are scientists working on a secret formula that accelerates plant growth. After the Hollands refuse the monetary offers and threats of a shadowy organisation known as The Conclave, their lab is bombed.  In his final moments, Alec runs into the swamp doused in the experimental formula.  Some time later he emerges as a swamp monster.  Linda is murdered and, enraged, the monster kills her assassins and flees.  Government agent Matthew Cable arrives on the scene and wrongly believes the Swamp Thing is responsible for Linda’s death.
The first appearance of the Alec Holland Swamp Thing, who would be the primary character throughout future series.

Swamp Thing #2
“The Man Who Wanted Forever”, December 1972/January 1973
Len Wein [w], Bernie Wrightson [p]
Swamp Thing is captured by misshapen “Un-Men” and brought to their master’s castle in the Balkans.  With Swamp Thing’s permission, the ageing Anton Arcane casts a spell that gives him control of the monster’s body, whilst giving Alec his human form back.  Alec overhears Arcane’s plan to destroy the local village and so breaks the spell, and Arcane falls out of a high tower.
The first appearance of Swamp Thing’s arch-nemesis Anton Arcane.  Also, more information is revealed about Swamp Thing’s physiology.

Swamp Thing #3
“The Patchwork Man”, February/March 1973
Len Wein [w], Bernie Wrightson [p]
Matt Cable travels to the Balkans in search of Swamp Thing and meets Anton’s niece Abigail.  Swamp Thing briefly meets “Patchwork Man” Gregori Arcane, who was once blown up by a landmine but pieced back together by his brother Anton, who then kept him captive in his castle. Gregori abducts his daughter Abigail and Swamp Thing confronts him.  A battle ensues, endangering Abigail, until Gregori seemingly sacrifices his life to save that of his daughter.
The Patchwork Man briefly returns in House of Secrets #140 (Feb./Mar. 1976).

Swamp Thing #4
“Monster on the Moors!”, April/May 1973
Len Wein [w], Bernie Wrightson [p]
A plane carrying Matt and Abigail (and Swamp Thing as a stowaway) crashes in the Scottish moors.  Matt and Abby are rescued by Jenna and Angus MacCobb and stay in their castle.  The surrounding area has been terrorised by a werewolf who, unbeknownst to the guests, is the MacCobb’s son Ian.  Matt is drugged and the MacCobbs attempt a total blood transfusion between Matt and their son to rid him of his affliction.  The plan is foiled when Swamp Thing again comes to the rescue.

Swamp Thing #5
“The Last of the Ravenwind Witches!”, July/August 1973
Len Wein [w], Bernie Wrightson [p]
Swamp Thing travels to Maine and meets Rebecca Ravenwind and her brother Timothy, who are accused by the townsfolk of being witches.  The trio are attacked, resulting in Swamp Thing’s arm being severed and the Ravenwinds being captured.  Swampy’s arm grows back and he rescues the couple as they’re about to be executed, only to discover that Timothy actually does have magical powers.

Swamp Thing #6
“A Clockwork Horror”, September/October 1973
Len Wein [w], Bernie Wrightson [p]
Swamp Thing finds himself in Bürgess Town, which is populated by robotic humans (including duplicates of Alex and Linda Holland) and their creator Mayor Klochmann.  Matt and Abigail also arrive in the town but are captured and helicoptered away by Conclave agents who have come to kidnap Klochmann.  The Holland robots are destroyed and Swampy flies into a rage.  In the ensuing chaos, Klochmann is killed causing the remaining robots to turn on the assailants.

Superboy (1949) #198
“The Fatal Five Who Twisted Time”, October 1973
Cary Bates [w], Dave Cockrum [p]
A young Clark Kent and Lana Lang enter a carnival and find the Emerald Empress (a 30th century villain) posing as a gypsy. Clark, now as Superboy, is captured by the Empress and other members of the Fatal Five, affecting the 30th century world of the Legion of Super-Heroes. The Legion travel back in time and destroy the Fatal Five’s time-sorting machine, restoring everything back to normal.
Clark and Lana enter a carnival tent marked ‘Horror Haven’, which has statues of Swampy (and seemingly Marvel’s Man-Thing) at the entrance.

Swamp Thing #7
“Night of the Bat”, November/December 1973
Len Wein [w], Bernie Wrightson [p]
Swamp Thing travels to Gotham in search of Matt and Abby, who are being tortured by the head of Conclave, Mr. E (now revealed to be Nathan Ellery).  Swamp Thing rescues Matt and Abby and realises that it is the Conclave who killed Linda.  Meanwhile, Batman is also looking for the criminal Mr. E when he is instructed by Commissioner Gordon to apprehend the recently sighted Swamp Thing.  Batman and Swamp Thing fight but Swamp Thing escapes.  They meet again in Ellery’s penthouse apartment, where Swamp Thing accidentally pushes Ellery off of the balcony before disappearing.
Swamp Thing’s appearance in Gotham and meeting with Batman is his first involvement with the wider DC Universe. Reprinted in ‘Batman’s Strangest Cases’ (Limited Collectors’ Edition series #C-59, 1978), Batman Monthly #34 (Apr. 1990, a UK Batman reprints series published by London Editions Magazines), and ‘Batman: Hidden Treasures’ (2010, recoloured).

Swamp Thing #8
“A Lurker in Tunnel 13!”, January/February 1974
Len Wein [w], Bernie Wrightson [p]
Swamp Thing hears a fatally wounded man recount a story about his father, Abraham, who once used sorcery to try and restore the wealth of a mining town (Perdition), but instead summoned an evil force that led to the disappearances of townsfolk.  Swamp Thing takes the dead man into town and is greeted by the locals. When a young boy disappears, Swamp Thing is tricked by the townspeople into searching for the boy in Tunnel 13.  Inside, Swamp Thing encounters the monster M’Nagalah, who has been absorbing humans in the mine.  Swamp Thing causes a cave-in and believes that he has destroyed the evil entity, but we see that the parasitic monster has attached itself to Abraham’s grandson.

Swamp Thing #9
“The Stalker From Beyond!”, March/April 1974
Len Wein [w], Bernie Wrightson [p]
Swamp Thing finds himself back at the Holland’s swamp laboratory and hopes to find a way to turn himself human again.  Instead, he finds that the barn and some of the equipment has been used to house and repair an alien spacecraft.  Frustrated, he attacks but is severely injured by the alien, who remorsefully places Swampy’s body in the swamp to restore him.  In the meantime, Cable and other government agents have come to investigate the alien landing.  They capture the alien and argue about what to do with it.  Captain Samson attempts to kill the alien but is foiled by Swamp Thing, who helps the alien escape to his ship.  The alien communicates with all of them that it has come to the planet in peace, but has found only violence.  The alien attempts to leave in his ship, destroying the barn/laboratory, but the ship explodes in mid-air.

Swamp Thing #10
“The Man Who Would Not Die!”, May/June 1974
Len Wein [w], Bernie Wrightson [w, p]
Swamp Thing saves an old woman who is being attacked.  She relates a story about a plantation that used to be in the area that was run by slavemaster Samson Parminter, who killed a man (Jubal) for protecting a fellow slave (Elsbeth).  As he was about to be killed, Jubal cursed the slavemaster, and some time later Parminter was found to have been violently killed.  After this story, Swamp Thing encounters Anton Arcane in a cemetery.  Arcane explains that his body was shattered by the fall from the tower in Swamp Thing #2 but was pieced back together by his Un-Men.   Arcane again wants Swamp Thing’s body and power, but in his rant about enslaving humanity, he awakens the spirit of Jubal.  Jubal and the ghosts of other slaves attack Arcane and the Un-Men as Swamp Thing falls unconscious.  When he awakens, there are several new tombstones in the area, representing Arcane and his followers.  Swamp Thing finds another tombstone and realises that the old woman who recounted the story was the ghost of Elsbeth.

Swamp Thing #11
“The Conqueror Worms!”, July/August 1974
Len Wein [w], Nestor Redondo [p], Luis Dominguez [c]
Matt Cable and Abby are attacked by mutant creatures in the swamp while searching for Swamp Thing and are brought by giant worms to an underground building named New Eden. There they meet other captives and Zachary Nail, who appears to be the leader of the worms and who has constructed New Eden as a sanctuary from the polluted outside world. With the aid of Swamp Thing, the captives manage to kill some worms and hold Nail hostage, only to find that the worms have their own agenda and only want to protect humanity as a food source. There is a fight and Nail kills one of the women. Her partner, Bolt, goes to kill Nail but is stopped by Swamp Thing, who then helps the former captives escape just before New Eden explodes.
Zachary Nail and New Eden first appeared in ‘Spectre of the Stalking Swamp’ from Phantom Stranger #14 (Aug. 1971) – another Len Wein story featuring a swamp monster.

Swamp Thing #12
“The Eternity Man”, September/October 1974
Len Wein [w], Nestor Redondo [p]
Swamp Thing discovers a large jewel that transports him first to a prehistoric time of dinosaurs and then to Rome circa 100 A.D.  Each time he witnesses the death of a man before being transported again.  Whilst in 14th century Europe, Swamp Thing learns that the man is Milo Mobius, who has been granted eternal life by the magic jewel but is cursed to relive his life again from time’s beginning each time that he dies.  Only Mobius’ death at the hands of a friend can stop his cycle of time travelling.  Swamp Thing witnesses Mobius’ death again in the 14th century and in the Civil War-era, before being returned to the present day swamp.  For a final time he meets Mobius, who begs Swamp Thing to kill him, but Swamp Thing refuses.  Mobius then drowns in quicksand and his body disappears.  Swamp Thing hides the cursed jewel.

Swamp Thing #13
“The Leviathan Conspiracy”, November/December 1974
Len Wein [w], Nestor Redondo [p]
Swamp Thing is captured by Cable and other government agents and taken to Washington D.C., where he is studied by John Zero and Professor Degréz.  Degréz is accidentally killed when Swamp Thing tries to escape.  Unhappy with how Swamp Thing is being treated by his captors, Cable attempts communication and learns that the monster is Alec Holland.  Cable, Abby and Bolt help Swampy escape by blowing up the facility and smuggling him out in Degréz’s coffin.  Swamp Thing emerges from the cemetery, sees the headstones of Linda and Alec Holland, and decides to return to the swamp alone.

Swamp Thing #14
“The Tomorrow Children”, January/February 1975
David Michelinie [w], Nestor Redondo [p]
Swamp Thing protects a strange-looking child (Seth Wheeler) from an angry mob led by a bigoted local named Rafe Taggert. Taggert accuses Seth and his siblings of having malevolent powers.  Swamp Thing is attacked by a giant mutated ant but is rescued by the children and taken to their treehouse in the swamp.  He learns that the Wheelers have special powers due to some radioactive waste in the area, which also explains the large mutated animals that have been appearing in recent issues.  While Swampy and the children are out, a boy from the town named Jimbo comes to the treehouse to warn the Wheelers of the approaching mob.  Taggert and the townsfolk set fire to the treehouse not knowing that Jimbo is inside.  Swamp Thing and the Wheelers work together to save the boy from the flames, but one of the Wheeler children dies during the rescue.

Swamp Thing #15
“The Soul-Spell of Father Bliss”, March/April 1975
David Michelinie [w], Nestor Redondo [p]
Swamp Thing is struck by lightning in a storm but is aided by Father Bliss and taken to a dilapidated church.  In order to bring about Armageddon and restore his flock, Bliss uses a spell to trap Holland’s soul in a floating orb, while Swamp Thing’s body is possessed by the demon Nebiros.  Abby and Cable arrive and are captured but Cable convinces the priest of the error of his ways.  As Bliss battles Swamp Thing, Cable smashes the orb, which restores Swamp Thing’s control over his body.  Nebiros temporarily takes the physical form of a demon but requires a host quickly.  Father Bliss atones for his previous deceptions by offering up his body, knowing that his frail form will not be enough to contain the demon, and both he and Nebiros perish.
It is first hinted at here that Abby has some specials powers of foresight, but these and other powers seem to have disappeared by the end of the volume.

Swamp Thing #16
“Night of the Warring Dead”, May 1975
David Michelinie [w], Nestor Redondo [p]
Abby, Cable and Swamp Thing travel by commercial airline to track down Bolt, who was kidnapped in the previous issue.  While preventing a hijacking, Swamp Thing falls out of the plane.  He finds himself on the island of Kalo Pago and meets revolutionary leader and priestess Laganna, and mercenary Adam Rook.  The trio come under attack and Swamp Thing is captured by soldiers of the ruling government.  Laganna summons an undead army to rescue Swamp Thing. Horrified, Swampy destroys the talisman (the source of Laganna’s power), destroying the the zombies and leading to the deaths of the revolutionaries.

Swamp Thing #17
“The Destiny Machine”, July 1975
David Michelinie [w], Nestor Redondo [p]
Abby and Cable find themselves near the jungle base of Nathan Ellery, where Bolt is being held and tortured.  They are captured and learn that Ellery has survived his high-rise fall (seen in #7) and blames Swamp Thing for his paralytic condition.  He has also constructed a machine that scrambles the minds of leaders and hopes to use it to rule the world. Swampy also finds himself near the base, defeats a number of Ellery’s robot defences, and finally confronts Ellery, the killer of his wife Linda.  Ellery is electrocuted to death and the captives are freed.

Swamp Thing #18
“Village of the Doomed”, September 1975
David Michelinie [w], Nestor Redondo [p]
Following a helicopter crash, Abby and Cable take the injured Bolt to a retirement village managed by a young man named Aubrey Trask.  It is soon revealed that Aubrey is actually an old man and uses magic to steal youth from others.  The guests are to subjected to Trask’s spell and begin to grow old.  Abby escapes and Trask’s magic book is burned, breaking the spell and killing Aubrey Trask.
Abby uses telekinesis to undo her bindings, but she never possesses this power again.

The Brave and the Bold (1955) #122
“The Hour of the Beast”, October 1975
Bob Haney [w], Jim Aparo [p]
The Swamp Thing has been captured and put on display in Gotham.  When plants attack the city, Batman helps Swamp Thing escape and the two work together to save the city.

Swamp Thing #19
“A Second Time to Die”, October 1975
Gerry Conway [w], Nestor Redondo [p]
A mindless duplicate Swamp Thing, which has grown from Swampy’s severed arm in issue #5, is discovered and offered shelter by a Seminole man named Ho’tah Makanaw.  Ho’tah is nearly 200 years old but has become immortal by drinking from the Grotto of Eternal Youth.  Meanwhile, Abby, Cable and Bolt arrive in Gatorberg looking for the real Swamp Thing.

Swamp Thing #20
“The Mirror Monster”, January 1976
Gerry Conway [w], Nestor Redondo [p], Ernie Chan [c]
The real Swamp Thing encounters and fends off some local bikers.  Cable and Bolt visit a construction site when a controlled explosion causes extensive damage to Ho’tah’s magical pool.  Enraged, Ho’tah sends his swamp monster to attack the construction workers.  Both of the Swamp Things meet and fight.  Ho’tah is killed by bigoted locals and, when the duplicate Swamp Thing goes to his aid, he too is killed.
This seems to be Bolt’s last appearance in the DC Universe.  Abby and Cable do not appear with Swampy again until Vol. 2, though Cable guest stars with Doom Patrol in Showcase #94-96 (1977/78).

House of Secrets (1956) #140
“Reprise:The Patchwork Man”, February/March 1976
Gerry Conway [w], Nestor Redondo [p], Ernie Chan [c]
The Patchwork Man is captured in a city and forced to endure painful experiments before escaping.
Swamp Thing appears in a flashback scene recounting the events of Swamp Thing #3 (the previous appearance of Patchwork Man).
The follow-up story was intended to be published in
House of Secrets #141 but it was cancelled.  It was eventually published in issue #3 of the European reprint series Gigant (1983) and has not been published in the US.  There is a Swedish language edition, and possibly Norwegian and other versions.  The Swedish edition, accompanied by an English translation, can be found here.  Swamp Thing does not appear.

Swamp Thing #21
“Requiem”, March 1976
David Michelinie [w], Nestor Redondo [p]
Solus has been banished from his home planet for regicide and, as further punishment, if he touches the soil of any planet he will die.  Exiled to his spacecraft, Solus collects beings from around the galaxy to keep him amused, and he kidnaps Swamp Thing from the planet Earth.  Solus’ favourite prisoner Cellanth helps the others to escape.  Furious, Solus kills her, but immediately regrets this and attacks the rest of the captives.  Eventually Solus is overcome, and dies when he grabs Swamp Thing who is made of terrestrial matter.  Swamp Thing is teleported home before the spacecraft explodes.

Swamp Thing #22
“The Solomon Plague”, May 1976
David Michelinie [w], Nestor Redondo [p], Ernie Chan [c]
Swamp Thing is captured and brought to a secret lab managed by Dr. Solomon.  There he meets some victims of a government weapons test who have been forcibly quarantined from society.  There is an escape attempt and Solomon must kill his own infected son to stop him from transmitting the sickness to the outside world.  Solomon allows Swamp Thing to leave before causing the installation to self-destruct.

Swamp Thing #23
“Rebirth and Nightmare”, July 1976
Gerry Conway [w], Nestor Redondo [p], Ernie Chan [c]
Swamp Thing tracks down his brother Edward, a fellow scientist, who attempts to transform Swamp Thing back into human form with the help of his assistant Ruth Monroe.  Swampy is attacked by John Zero (last seen in #13), who now inexplicably has a sword for a hand and calls himself Sabre.  Swamp Thing manages to fend him off before transforming into Alec Holland.
These events were ignored by subsequent Swamp Thing stories and so are now considered non-canon.  Then-editor Len Wein explicitly states in the letters section of The Saga of Swamp Thing #6 (Oct. 1982) that the events after Swamp Thing #21 (Mar. 1976) did not happen – specifically, that Swamp Thing never became human again and never had a brother.

Swamp Thing #24
“The Earth Below”, September 1976
David Anthony Kraft, Gerry Conway [w], Ernie Chan, Fred Carrillo [p]
Alec Holland tries to adjust to being human again but is attacked by Thrudvang, The Earth Master.  Despite his weakened state, he manages to defeat the monster and protect Ruth.
These events were ignored by subsequent Swamp Thing stories and so are now considered non-canon.  The final panel advertises a battle with Hawkman, but the series was cancelled and Swamp Thing #25 was never published.

Swamp Thing #25 [Unpublished]
“The Sky Above”, November 1976
David Anthony Kraft [w], Ernie Chan, Fred Carrillo [p]
Alec is suffering severe pains as a side effect of his transformation back into human form. He and Ruth travel to Edward’s house but find the lab smashed and Edward missing. They decide to visit a doctor but Alec transforms back into Swamp Thing against his will and bursts out of the car onto a busy highway.  Hawkman, who witnesses the commotion from a spacecraft, attacks Swamp Thing but is overpowered.  Hawkman then meets Sabre, who has recently finished off the injured Thrudvang.  Sabre and Edward Holland (jealous of his brother’s closeness to Ruth) convince Hawkman that Swamp Thing is a dangerous criminal and must be stopped.  Hawkman again engages with Swamp Thing, dropping him from a great height into a river, from which Swampy emerges again as Alec Holland and flees the scene with Ruth.
This issue was fully scripted and at least partially pencilled and inked but was never published.  Scans of many of the pages have since appeared online at Heritage Auctions and in Back Issue #66 (Aug. 2013) [see Bibliography].  The plot, script, and all of the pages (including a Yanick Paquette re-creation of p. 15) can be found here.

Challengers of the Unknown (1958) #82-#84
#82: “The Lurker Below”, August/September 1977
Gerry Conway [w], Michael Netzer [p, c], Joe Rubinstein [c]
#83: “Seven Doorways To Destiny”, October/November 1977
#84: “To Save A Monster”, December 1977/January 1978
Gerry Conway [w], Keith Giffen [p], Joe Rubinstein, Rich Buckler [c]
In #82, the titular Challengers travel to Perdition to seek a cure for an infection afflicting Prof. Haley.  They meet with Dr. Heathcliff Monroe, who is possessed by an evil parasitic entity known as M’Nagalah.  A flashback recounts Swamp Thing’s battle with the monster from Swamp Thing #8.  In #83, Clayburne seeks help from Alec Holland and they both travel to Perdition.  Without ongoing treatment, Alec transforms back into Swamp Thing permanently and destroys M’Nagalah.  In #84, Deadman rids Prof. Haley of his infection.  The team realise that Alec has become Swamp Thing and go to offer assistance, only to find that he is being telepathically controlled by the villain Multi-Man.  Deadman rescues Swamp Thing by breaking the telepathic link.
The events surrounding Swamp Thing’s transformation into Alec Holland and back were ignored by subsequent Swamp Thing stories and so are now considered non-canon.

Challengers of the Unknown (1958) #85-#87
#85: “The Creature From The End Of Time”, February/March 1978
Gerry Conway [w], Keith Giffen [p], Rich Buckler, Jack Abel [c]
#86: “The War At Times End”, April/May 1978
Gerry Conway [w], Keith Giffen [p], Rich Buckler, Frank Giacoia [c]
#87: “Twelve Million Years to Twilight”, June/July 1978
Gerry Conway, Carla Conway [w], Keith Giffen [p], Alex Saviuk, Dick Giordano [c]
The Challengers, Deadman and Swamp Thing investigate the mysterious appearances of giant boxes and monsters from the future.  The team visits the lab of Time Master Rip Hunter for advice, only to find it deserted. In #86, the group travels via Hunter’s Time Sphere to the future.  There they find that oppressive rulers known as Sunset Lords are sending flawed genetic experiments (the monsters) back into the 20th Century using the enslaved Rip Hunter’s technology.  Swamp Thing and some of the Challengers are attacked and captured, but escape in #87 and overthrow the Sunset Lords with the help of Deadman, Rip Hunter and Lucas Lawspeaker.

DC Comics Presents (1978) #8
“The Sixty Deaths Of Solomon Grundy!”, April 1979
Steve Englehart [w], Murphy Anderson [p], Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez [c]
Swamp Thing finds Solomon Grundy in the sewers and helps him fend off an attack by Superman.  As Grundy was also spawned from a swamp, Swamp Thing believes that experiments may provide some clues as to how to reverse his condition. Tests reveal that Grundy is not made of living matter and so he is of no use to Swamp Thing.  Meanwhile, duplicates of Grundy have been attacking the city so Superman finds a way to destroy all of the Grundys, to Swamp Thing’s dismay.
Reprinted in The Best Of DC #54 (Nov. 1984).

The Super Friends (1976) #28
“Masquerade of Madness!”, January 1980
E. Nelson Bridwell [w], Ramona Fradon [p, c], Bob Smith [c]
On Halloween, a number of guests attend a party in Gotham dressed as different superheroes (including Swamp Thing).  Felix Faust appears and tells the guests that they are trapped in their superhero costume identities unless they give him their priceless gems.  Some real superheroes show up to help, but Faust makes the guests attack them, pitting “Swamp Thing” against Aquaman.  Eventually the Wonder Twins and Jimmy Olsen knock Faust unconscious, breaking the spell. 
Non-continuity as this is just someone in a Swamp Thing Halloween costume.

The Brave and the Bold (1955) #176
“The Delta Connection”, July 1981
Martin Pasko [w], Jim Aparo [p], Mike Kaluta [c]
Batman searches for prison escapee Felicia Kyle upon request by her sister Selina (Catwoman), who believes Felicia to be in mortal danger.  Swamp Thing finds her in Louisiana and tries to protect her from hitman Calvin Traller and an unwitting accomplice.  Batman arrives on the scene but his Whirly-Bat is shot from the sky and he crashes into Swamp Thing.  In the confusion Traller manages to kill Felicia, while Swamp Thing, dazed from the accident, temporarily mistakes the dead woman for his wife Linda.  Batman and Swamp Thing team up to track down and capture Traller.


[w] denotes writer, [p] denotes penciller, but I have included both penciller and inker if both are credited equally as artists. [c] denotes cover artist, but I have mostly only included the last in instances where Swampy is illustrated by someone other than the inside penciller.